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stephonthekob

Sep 2 '14
Sep 2 '14

(Source: irwinhat)

Sep 2 '14

rhamphotheca:

David Shale’s Amazing Photographs of Deep Sea Creatures 

David Shale has captured thousands of creatures from deep water, here’s how he does it     

by Dan Richards

David Shale has been filming and photographing these creatures of the deep for nearly four decades, for both scientific research as well as TV nature programs. His experiences give him a long perspective on the advances in photography and exploration of this strange undersea world.

Shale, who holds a doctoral degree in marine biology, began photographing deep-sea animals in the 1970s for the U.K.-based Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (now the National Oceanography Centre). He left to become a wildlife filmmaker, but the two paths merged in the 1990s when The Blue Planet, the BBC oceanography series, took him on as a cinematographer…

(read more: Pop Photo.com)

Sep 2 '14
babalou71:

Weathered Barn in Spring

babalou71:

Weathered Barn in Spring

Sep 2 '14
shiyoonkim:

California style rain on 15 Park St, London*

shiyoonkim:

California style rain on 15 Park St, London*

1,112 notes (via shiyoonkim) Tags: art
Sep 2 '14
enlighteningart:

Vincent van Gogh
Branches with Almond Blossom, 1890

enlighteningart:

Vincent van Gogh

Branches with Almond Blossom, 1890

Sep 2 '14
Sep 2 '14
Sep 2 '14
libutron:

Eurasian Roller: The Smell of Fear
Rollers are one of my favorite birds, not only for its colorful plumage, but also for the splendid symmetry in the arrangement of their feathers, which is seen when their wings are extended.
This is Coracias garrulus (Coraciiformes - Coraciidae), better known as Eurasian Roller, a Near Threatened species found in Europa, Asia and Africa.
Many animals react to danger by producing chemical cues that can be smelled by others, which is called the smell of fear. Some bird species produce chemical compounds when threatened, such as nestlings of Coracias garrulus that vomit an odorous orange liquid when scared in their nests.
Indeed, a study showed that the supposedly defensive liquid which nestling rollers vomit when disturbed is smelled by parents so that they can adjust their behavior to avoid predation. Therefore, the expelling of vomit may act as a cue informing parents of a recent danger at their nests. Interestingly too, this research add to the growing body of evidence showing that birds are not anosmic (unable to perceive odors) and that they may rely on olfaction for important tasks.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Hendri Venter
Locality: Kruger National Park, South Africa

libutron:

Eurasian Roller: The Smell of Fear

Rollers are one of my favorite birds, not only for its colorful plumage, but also for the splendid symmetry in the arrangement of their feathers, which is seen when their wings are extended.

This is Coracias garrulus (Coraciiformes - Coraciidae), better known as Eurasian Roller, a Near Threatened species found in Europa, Asia and Africa.

Many animals react to danger by producing chemical cues that can be smelled by others, which is called the smell of fear. Some bird species produce chemical compounds when threatened, such as nestlings of Coracias garrulus that vomit an odorous orange liquid when scared in their nests.

Indeed, a study showed that the supposedly defensive liquid which nestling rollers vomit when disturbed is smelled by parents so that they can adjust their behavior to avoid predation. Therefore, the expelling of vomit may act as a cue informing parents of a recent danger at their nests. Interestingly too, this research add to the growing body of evidence showing that birds are not anosmic (unable to perceive odors) and that they may rely on olfaction for important tasks.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Hendri Venter

Locality: Kruger National Park, South Africa

Sep 2 '14